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Salute To Service

The Heritage Group Honors Heroes: Veterans Wave the Flag at Indianapolis Colts Game


It was one year ago that John Masterson, Sales Manager for US Aggregates and a United States Marine Corp veteran, hatched an idea for a unique and memorable way to show appreciation to veterans in the Heritage family.

“My colleague Ben Hardy and I were at a Colts game last year and were watching the flag ceremony. I mentioned to Ben that it was something we should look into doing as part of a Heritage Group community event,” said John. “Being a salesman, Ben was confident he knew someone with the Colts organization to help get this rolling.”

The idea grew into a collaboration between The Heritage Group and the Indianapolis Colts, two organizations united by a shared commitment to giving back to their communities. As a way to honor Heritage veterans, they and their families were invited to participate in the pre-game flag ceremony at the Colts’ November 26, 2023 “Salute to Service” home game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

The pre-game ceremony involves unfurling a 1,200-pound flag that spans the entire field. To pull off this feat requires the coordinated efforts of hundreds of volunteers on the ground. Ben and John collaborated with Sara Morris, Director of Strategic Experiences, to coordinate this massive event. Over the course of a few months and with the help of a special event committee, formal invitations were sent to all Heritage employees with veteran status, shirts were designed and ordered, transportation was scheduled and day-of plans were pieced together to keep participants enthusiastic and entertained.

“In coordinating with the Colts, we thought it best to first involve members of our Heritage employees and their families with veteran status. From that first invitation, we filled all 400 available positions, the maximum amount of people the Colts will allow to hold the flag,” notes Ben Hardy, Sales Representative for Asphalt Materials, Inc.

Beyond the overwhelming response for signups, Heritage veterans expressed gratitude for the chance to be a part of such a significant event. For the veterans involved, the experience was deeply moving. Many spoke of the sense of pride and connection they felt as they represented their fellow service members on such a grand stage.

“I’ve never worked for such a good company that honors our military veterans in this way. It’s just very humbling and an honor to not only be part of this event, but to work for Heritage,” said Brian Frank, Transport Driver for Heritage Transport, LLC and United States Navy veteran.

The collaboration with the Indianapolis Colts showcased THG’s potential to make a meaningful impact by fostering a sense of unity and appreciation.

“Acts like this show the company cares,” said John Masterson. “When The Heritage Group says they support veterans, they absolutely do and events like today are proof of that.”

The Heritage Group and its operating companies has long emphasized support for veterans with initiatives like mentorship programs, job placement services, and ongoing partnerships with veteran’s organizations. The success of the flag-holding ceremony demonstrated that there is a profound desire within our family of companies to recognize and support those who have served in the military.

The Heritage Group’s commitment to supporting veterans serves as a shining example of how businesses can make a positive impact on society while creating unforgettable experiences for those who have selflessly served our nation.

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Building More Than Roads

Tommy Gott of Milestone Contractors zips up a custom-made high visibility vest for his new friend Zayden

This past spring in the heart of Martinsville, Indiana, a significant project was underway – the construction of a brand-new roundabout. While the project itself was a remarkable feat, it was the story of a construction crew that would truly touch hearts and exemplify the core values of both Milestone Contractors and The Heritage Group.

Milestone Contractors is known for their dedication to quality construction and commitment to the communities they serve. But their impact often goes beyond asphalt and concrete – it extends to the people who witness their work firsthand.

The project, converting a dangerous five-point intersection into a roundabout, began in February 2023. “It was cold outside when we started this project,” said Tom “Tommy” Gott, Project Supervisor at Milestone Contractors. “As soon as Spring came, Zayden and his grandfather would come outside and walk around the site every day.”

Aden and Zayden, three-year-old twin brothers who live just steps away from the intersection, were among those who observed the daily hustle of the Milestone crew as they worked tirelessly on the roundabout project. The boys watched in awe as heavy machinery whirred and workers skillfully maneuvered equipment. The twins’ fascination with the construction site was apparent from the very beginning.

“They’ve been so interested in all of the equipment running up and down the road,” said Randy Padgett, grandfather of the twins. “I bring them out here every day and they’ve just fallen in love with it.”

For most construction workers, having an audience is just another day on the job. But Tommy and his crew saw something more in Aden and Zayden’s eager faces. Fascination soon turned into friendship as the crew warmed to the curiosity of the twins and recognized the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of these young boys. What started with a simple wave and a smile turned to bigger gestures like providing protective safety glasses to the boys and gifting them kid-sized hard hats, allowing them to feel like honorary members of the team. The twins even received personalized high visibility vests with Milestone patches handsewn on the front, compliments of Amy Bingham, Senior Safety Representative at Milestone.

“It reminded me of when my son was a kid and I’d bring him to job sites on the weekend so that he could see the equipment and pretend he was a construction worker, too,” reminisced Tommy. “This is all part of our effort to be good to everybody and the communities we serve.”

Twin brothers Aden and Zayden inspect a Milestone Contractors construction site outside their home in Martinsville, Indiana

Values in Action

Milestone Contractors and The Heritage Group have always upheld a strong commitment to their core values, and this heartwarming story truly exemplifies that commitment. By taking the time to befriend Aden and Zayden, Tommy and his crew embodied the values of integrity, respect and community engagement.

“This is just a perfect example of our people doing the right thing when others aren’t looking,” proclaimed Rob Rood, Senior Operations Manager for Bloomington & Terre Haute with Milestone Contractors. “It’s all just part of the culture we’ve built, knowing the guys on the crew have their own free will to do these acts of kindness, and we support it. It’s cool.”

As the roundabout project neared completion, the bond between Aden, Zayden and the construction crew remained strong. The twins had not only witnessed the construction of a physical structure but had also experienced the construction of lasting friendships and invaluable life lessons.

In considering the future of his grandsons, Randy Padgett is hopeful this experience instills strong work ethics and a commitment to hard work.

“I think they’re gonna learn something about work and what kind of job they can have in the future,” Randy noted.

In the end, Tommy Gott and the entire Milestone Contractors crew didn’t just build a roundabout in Martinsville, Indiana. They built friendships, and they exemplified The Heritage Group value of doing the right thing, always – even when it seems as if no one is watching.

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Talking Talent: John Glushik Takes the Helm of New Ventures

Early in 2023, John Glushik took the helm from Kip Frey as Executive Vice President of New Ventures and Managing Director for HG Ventures. The multi-faceted role puts John front-and-center of the ventures arm of The Heritage Group, where he directs the vetting, investment, incubation and growth of companies building innovative technologies and services related to THG’s industries. He also oversees the New Ventures internal incubation activities and the THG Accelerator, which brings a cohort of upstart hardtech company founders to Indianapolis for a three-month intensive program each year. Accelerator founders pilot their products, receive guidance from a network of mentors and prepare for successful launches into their industries. In a recent interview, John discusses his path to New Ventures and how he plans to leverage the entrepreneurial spirit of THG’s family of operating companies to best position us for institutional success.

Let’s discuss your journey to arriving here at The Heritage Group. You have a diverse educational background, studying mechanical engineering at Duke, achieving a master’s in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT and earning an MBA from Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern. What drove your educational pursuits and how have they played into your role today?

Early in my education, there was a lot of trying to find where I wanted to be longer term. I got into technology because I was just fascinated about how it could change the world. By the way, my major was the same as Fred Fehsenfeld Jr’s. We both went through the mechanical engineering and materials science curriculum at Duke University. Following undergrad, I went to work for General Electric (GE), where I completed a technology leadership program that allowed me to move around and become involved in different types of engineering. That exposure sparked my interest in mechanical engineering, first through aerospace, because I was excited about all the new technologies coming out of that industry.

I started research at GE that got me connected to the Draper lab at MIT, which meant being at the forefront of studying modern technologies, including GPS navigation. Now, GPS is part of our everyday lives, but in those days it was very early in its development. As intrigued as I was by research, I realized I didn’t want to be focused on a single technology, and I decided to attend business school. Through my time at Kellogg, I developed some basic skills in business and finance, but more importantly, I started building a network of relationships in the business world and specifically in the venture capital sector. All of this led me to consulting and portfolio work in areas of new technologies, which then led me to the venture industry.

When did you first cross paths with Kip Frey?

I first met Kip through my work with Intersouth Partners, a venture firm in Durham, North Carolina that invests in early-stage life science and technology companies. Kip was a rockstar entrepreneur, and our professional relationship began through Intersouth’s investments with his companies. We also had a chance to work together as partners at Intersouth for a few years. After leaving Intersouth, I reported to Kip when he hired me to help create the Duke Angel Network. Slowly throughout the years, our dynamic developed into a personal friendship. In collaborating with one another for so many years, our styles and roles are very complementary of one another. He’s been a fantastic mentor and our dynamic is built on a deep sense of trust and respect that you can only find when working with someone for years upon years. Kip is how I first learned of Fred Fehsenfeld, Jr. and what he and Amy were starting to develop with The Heritage Group with Kip’s help.

What was Kip’s pitch to you to uproot your family and move to Indianapolis to work with Ventures?

Kip indicated that Fred and Amy Schumacher were interested in building a new model of corporate venture investing that capitalized on the capabilities of The Heritage Group. He said, “Just come to Indianapolis and meet with the folks at The Center. Meet with Fred and Amy, see the vision that they’re building around their corporate venture practice.” And because it’s Kip, I could only say, “Yes, I trust you.” So I got on a plane and met with the three of them in early2018. My visit to the Center and my discussion with Fred and Amy validated everything that Kip had told me. There was a special opportunity to build something unique with great people. It also helped that my wife, Robyn, knew Kip and trusted him. We made the decision to start the process of leaving North Carolina. I commuted for a year, and eventually moved my family to Indianapolis in the summer of 2019.

Since arriving, what’s been the most surprising thing to you about The Heritage Group?

There’s an unprecedented level of partnership, collaboration and understanding that The Heritage Group has with its customers and business partners – it’s been built over decades. This isn’t your typical customer relationship, and it cuts across all our businesses as part of the culture at The Heritage Group. This was important to me because of some issues I have seen with other venture investing groups. They often interact with entrepreneurs in a strictly transactional way. Not here. It speaks to the stability and unparalleled understanding of our businesses and their partnerships with clients.

From a Ventures perspective, what’s it like collaborating across industry partnerships and the network of experts we employ at The Heritage Group?

When we started the group, we made it our mission to not simply be an investor, but to invest in areas where we can add value. I think that’s how we distinguish ourselves from a pure venture company. Of course, we perform deep diligence on all our investments and we structure deals with a focus on being good stewards of THG capital. However, what we do is very different, because it’s not strictly transactional. We will do everything we can to make companies a success by utilizing our connections and our Heritage network. Entrepreneurs are blown away by the level of feedback they receive across our companies. What The Heritage Group can do in terms of business relationships is something no other company can do in our industries.

What’s something you wish our employees and companies better understood about HG Ventures?

I want to make sure our employees know that we want to collaborate. If there’s a challenge they’re trying to overcome, we want to know about it, because we might be able to help. We can provide a window into the entrepreneurial ecosystem, which includes an awareness of early-stage companies that are creating innovative solutions for our industries. We want to create an open door for communication.

You’ve inherited this position with Ventures from Kip. Where do you plan to take it?

First, I think it’s important to note that while, yes, I’ve inherited this from Kip, I’ve always been aligned with his and Amy’s vision of Ventures. I want to lead Ventures in what I would call a deeper integration into our industries. Given what we’ve been able to build and develop in terms of a nice track record of success, I want to weave Ventures into the fabric of The Heritage Group. We can deepen our integration and leverage each other’s expertise so that we add value across our businesses.

If anyone within our operating units has any big ideas, anything they think can be the basis for a new business, we want to help. That’s where we see great potential to create game changing businesses. When I look at the next five years, that’s where I think we can make the biggest impact with our venture work. Internal incubation is where we’re truly harnessing the power of the innovative people that we have here.

What are some ideas emerging on the horizon that you’re particularly excited about?

Well, it certainly varies from quarter to quarter, depending on our market intelligence. Right now, I’m excited about a wide range of innovation trends including the future of roads, circular economy/recycling technologies and sustainable approaches to chemical manufacturing.

We’re good at finding entrepreneurs and companies that are creating things to address specific business and technology challenges. Effective communication across THG is really important so that we can leverage the power of people in our businesses who understand those challenges.

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Blazing Her Own Path

Women’s Equality Day is held annually on August 26 to honor the certification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which recognizes women’s right to vote. In celebration, The Heritage Group profiled Liz Larner, General Counsel of Heritage Construction + Materials (HC+M), to examine how women’s equality has played a role in her professional life.

HER STORY

Liz Larner knows exactly where she belongs. Whether she’s negotiating a mergers and acquisitions agreement in a boardroom or touring a jobsite in a truck and boots, Liz Larner feels perfectly in place as General Counsel for HC+M.

In her role, Liz is responsible for assessing risk involved within all the operating companies across HC+M, including US Aggregates, Asphalt Materials, Inc., and Milestone. Her responsibilities also include understanding environmental laws and regulations, managing both Human Resources and safety regulations, certifying compliance, maintaining a diverse, inclusive, and non-discriminatory workplace, and above all, ensuring the safety of our Heritage employees. As Liz explained, “A lot of times people think attorneys review contracts or oversee lawsuits–Law & Order type stuff. My lens is different where I am responsible for thinking through all sorts of risks to the company and risk mitigation. I think through future scenarios where if we don’t proactively respond, there is the likelihood of increased risk.”

To put employees and customers first, Liz works diligently to build and anticipate the needs of those she serves. “People hear the word attorney and think I must somehow be intimidating. The challenges come when I try educating people that I am here to help them,” Liz noted. “My view is you always want to talk to me because I promise to support you. I always say, Do what you do, and I am here to help you do it better.

PAVING HER OWN PATH

Prior to joining The Heritage Group in June 2021, Liz’s professional career had been a self-professed winding journey that included a role in the Indianapolis mayor’s office. “I worked for the Department of Public Works, so I know a thing or two about roads, sidewalks, and potholes,” she quipped. After attending law school with the hopes of breaking out as a civil rights attorney, Liz assessed her mounting student loan debt and opted instead to work for a large legal firm. This is where she developed her expertise in mergers and acquisitions, and while serving in an advisory role with a client, was asked to become their senior legal counsel. “I fell in love with being on the inside of business within an oil and gas operating company. I would close the deal, deliver a new company, determine benefits and payroll, and manage operations. Wanting to be on the inside of the business as a teammate while assisting with the legal aspect all resonated with me.”

This career shift sent Liz on a path in which she often found herself as the only woman operating within male-dominated industries. Liz leaned heavily on her upbringing and ability to connect with everyone. She noted, “My dad worked in construction and has always been a source of good advice.” That guidance includes being well-versed in the language of construction, over-preparing, and meeting people on their turf. “I learned early on that in order to gain trust and respect, I had to take as many face-to-face meetings as possible,” remarked Liz.

These traits have proven to be beneficial, particularly during tenses. “Meetings like that can be a painful process as it can get very contentious,” she said. In one proceeding, Liz recognized that the older male attorney representing the other side would not address her directly. “He only spoke to the man to my side, who is not only 10 years younger than me, but also has less legal experience.” Despite making decisions the entire meeting, the opposing side continued to not acknowledge Liz. “He wouldn’t look me in the eye,” she lamented. At the conclusion of the negotiations, the opposing representative finally recognized Liz, “If there’s one thing I’ve learned in these two days it’s that you are essential to this process.” Feeling accepted, Liz knew her deep knowledge, experience, and her friendly-yet-commanding approach is what earned her the respect.

While she has still experienced setbacks, Liz is thankful for the women before her that blazed trails to allow her to find her place. “I had some people who paved the path ahead of me and now I am interested in helping young women come up through the ranks,” said Liz.

FINDING OPPORTUNITY

Since joining The Heritage family, Liz has found a place that allows her to lean heavily on her expertise while operating in a welcoming, professional environment that celebrates her individual attributes. “One of the reasons I was attracted to The Heritage Group is because the opportunities are limitless and the culture is such that I can use my skill sets in ways that are truly appreciated,” Liz said. She also feels supported and empowered by witnessing strong women in leadership roles at Heritage. “In my past, there have been very few women in leadership roles. While I have typically reported to men, and while I still do, I’ve never been surrounded by as many women leaders as I am now. It’s refreshing,” Liz observed.


“One of the reasons I was attracted to The Heritage Group is because the opportunities are limitless and the culture is such that I can use my skill sets in ways that are truly appreciated,” Liz Larner, General Counsel, HC+M


While ensuring her fellow female colleagues are afforded mutual respect and are aware of avenues to develop their talent, Liz indicates there is still potential for empowerment opportunities in the professional setting. For her, achieving equality within the workforce means that male colleagues, especially those in positions of leadership, need to be challenged and encouraged to advocate for all voices. “I want men in leadership positions to be champions of equality, to be mentors for women,” said Liz. This advice also extends to female colleagues. “There have been times when I’ve questioned whether I should be at the table. I tell younger women to sit at the table. I remind them that they belong there,” she asserted.

For Liz, gaining equality in the workforce means that women need to consult in more advisory roles, sit on more boards, and serve in leadership positions. While she notes that equitability awareness is increasing, she’s persistent in her belief that the road ahead is long. Looking to the future, Liz’s steadfast expectations are as high as her ambitions. “There’s scientific data behind the fact that women in leadership is better for professional relationships, it’s better for cultures, and it’s better for revenue.”

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Growth, Good Business and Giving Back

As a Director of Operations at Heritage Interactive Services, Shaun Miller oversees business in the US and Canada. When he started out, he had no idea how far a career in sustainability would take him. We sat down with Shaun to talk about the evolution of his career over the last nine years.

 

Let’s get started with the beginning of your journey. How did you first hear about Heritage?

 

I went to Indiana State, and when I graduated, I had taken over as general manager of a fine dining restaurant in Terre Haute, Indiana—but I lived on the west side of Indy. That’s a heck of a commute—it’s an hour and a half each way, but 23 years old and GM of a nice restaurant was a great place to start. At the time, my brother-in-law David Cripe worked for Heritage Environmental Services (HES). He said, “I know you’re not sure what you want to do, but if you want to be closer to home, Heritage is always hiring.” I took the chance and started as a temporary employee at HES in fixation (the management and disposal of contaminated waste by immobilizing hazardous contaminants). Fast forward several months later, I became group leader, and I was still trying to figure out where I wanted to be. Every time I had an opportunity to leave this organization, they gave me a reason to stay.

 

After my promotion to group leader, I helped deploy the HES call center, worked inside sales, and in 2014 I was again at a crossroads. I had gained all this experience, and I wanted a career, so I had to decide, where do I want to go? I interviewed for a program manager position at Heritage Interactive and got the job—and as much as I enjoyed the hazardous waste side, I loved broadening my horizons and being able to move into non-hazardous waste, and trash and recyclables, and byproducts and all kinds of commodities.

 

Then I went from program manager to senior program manager to operations manager and here I am as a director today. Now, I’m at the forefront of world-class sustainability services for our customers, which is awesome. For instance, we’ve aided companies in diverting their byproduct waste, contributing to zero landfill status—and more recently, we worked with ClimeCo to help March Madness go carbon neutral.

 

I can’t wait to see where I’ll be three years from now, but it’ll be at Heritage, you know? All these synchronicities brought so much opportunity, and I worked to make the most of it. And I’m happy to be here!

 

Could you go over a bit about how Heritage has invested in you?

 

How much time you got? (laughs) I’m a big Peyton Manning fan, and he always talks about not always being the smartest in the room, not always being the toughest in the room, but outworking everybody in the room. And that’s always been my mantra—if I’m dedicated to something, I’m going to find every way I can to add value to the organization. I’ve done that over the years, and this company has been good about recognizing that. Whether that’s about collaboration opportunities, promotions or bonuses, growth as an individual, I could go on and on.

 

The biggest impact on me was back in 2018, when I was promoted from Operations Manager to Director, it happened to line directly up with the Connect, Collaborate, Innovate (CCI) initiative. It’s a training program where THG invests in the future of potential leaders from across the family of companies. It created relationships and bridges across the organization. You were able to meet people whom you wouldn’t have otherwise known—and I used that network just last week to introduce a colleague to a resource at another Heritage company! I was able to be a bridge for others, which is a great thing, and I know that there are others willing to be a bridge for me as well.

Shaun (right) with Jeff Laborsky of Heritage Environmental Services

 

Is there a point that stands out to you when you realized that this was a career as opposed to just a job?

 

When I moved from HES to HIS, I could see the runway of what we could do, both when I was there initially and what we could grow into. I was able to work as I saw fit and add value to the organization—and the fact that Heritage enables me to work in such a way—it all just kind of clicked. And that’s continued to evolve over time, because the term sustainability evolves every day, and it’s an exciting time to be in this industry. We’re talking about the course of a few years, but I would say sometime around 2015, 2016, I was like “okay—this is where I want to be.”

 

What does it mean to you to be part of a family business?

 

A lot of companies will say, “we’re a big family,” but everything I’ve seen here proves that leadership truly lives out that mantra. I met my boss now, Peter Lux, when I was going through CCI and getting exposed to THG; again, this company provided me that just because I worked for it and was vocal about where I wanted to go within The Heritage Group. Getting to know Peter and work with him, and now directly working for him, it was the same mentality. Whether I’m sitting in my office, with our team, or I’m having that exposure to a higher level, the feeling is always the same.

We’re given access to capital and resources and things that a very large organization typically has access to, but there’s always that personal feel to the interactions with our leadership—in how they empower us to manage and to make our own decisions. Not all companies will afford you that autonomy, and I think that has a lot to do with this organization having that family ownership and mentality.

Shaun with his family

Do you feel like that also affects the way you interact with customers or clients?

 

I think so. I think this is an empathy-minded organization, and I try to lead with that. When you have that servant leadership attitude, doors open, it shows your customers that you care, it affords you business retention and trust. The culture here definitely affects how I do business. Not only that, but this company gives me the opportunity to investigate new things.

 

My work style over time is taking every opportunity I see to invest in others. That’s been engrained in me in large part due to this organization and the way they’ve treated me. I try to pay that forward to my employees, my colleagues, my leadership, my customers, my suppliers, and it bleeds over into your personal life, too. When you see that, and you see the benefit of it, you lead with that. It’s about touching as many lives as possible and impacting others in a positive way. There’s always the chance that it could come back around—you never know. It builds relationships and trust, and it’s good business, too.

Where does your passion for sustainability come from?

 

I fell into sustainability. It just kind of happened, and before I knew it, I was in deep. I realized how much I liked it, and it’s such a broad term today. But to me, sustainability is not just about waste. It’s about time, equipment, people and labor. It’s about opportunity and attitude. Sustainability, to me, is so much of elongating the things in life that we will inevitably need indefinitely in so many different ways. That’s why I like where we’re at now. A couple years ago, it was all about supporting zero waste to landfill, and then simply zero waste—now it’s bringing in carbon neutrality. I have a call coming up with one of our customers to support zero water discharge, and my colleague is working on industrial hygiene for other customers and compressed air efficiencies and water balancing for another. It’s such a spiral of potential in the term sustainability. And it’s not all about hugging trees—it goes so much more beyond that. It’s a discipline.

Shaun with his team

What’s your advice to someone who is at the same place that you were when you graduated college, looking for an opportunity?

One of the scariest things in the world is to be vulnerable, but my best advice to my younger self and to anyone in that position is to stay humble and vulnerable. It’s a nice way of saying, “ask stupid questions.” And there aren’t really any out there, which I know is a cliché, but you can’t shrink into yourself. You have to find ways to get out of your comfort zone. I’m not a great public speaker—I mean I can speak to my customers, to my team, but even in a Teams call, if there’s 80 people, or in a huge venue, I get a little squirrely. So what I’ve done is found situations to intentionally put myself out there, and know that I was going to look silly, but convincing yourself that it’s okay, is probably the hardest part. If you don’t ask, you’ll never know it, and at some point, you won’t be as good at your job for not knowing. Read, research, learn. I hope that when I’m at retirement age, I’m still looking for ways to learn, and it’s only going to benefit you. It’s never a waste of time.

 

Right now, what is exciting to you in this moment of your career?

 

Over the last five years, we doubled in size. We invested heavily in people, and in training—KPIs, too. Another interesting aspect between the public and private sector is that we have the ability to integrate, measure, grade and improve, so we focused on our metrics so that we could maintain scalable, rapid growth. We also invested in our people so that we have the right folks in the right positions, and it set us up for where we are today. Our fiscal year just ended—another record year, and our growth rate is ridiculous, and we’re prepared for it now.

 

We’ve been working within sustainability since 2000, and the evolution of sustainability over the last 20+ years has been phenomenal, and volatile in another way, and opportunistic. Now we’re here, and I’m watching The Heritage Group through Techstars, Heritage Sustainability Investments, all these different elements and the ability to access all those resources— it’s all growing. It’s an exciting time to be here because I’m not exactly sure where we’re going to go, but I know it’s going to be great.